Bruno Taut

Bruno Taut
Bruno Julius Florian Taut (1880-1938) was a prolific German architect, urban planner and author active in the Weimar period. Taut is best known for his theoretical work, speculative writings, and a handful of exhibition buildings. Taut's best-known single building is the prismatic dome of the Glass Pavilion at the Cologne Werkbund Exhibition (1914). His sketches for "Alpine Architecture" (1917) are the work of an unabashed Utopian visionary, and he is variously classified as a Modernist and an Expressionist. This reputation does not accurately reflect Taut's extensive body of housing and his social and practical accomplishments. Much of Taut's work in German remains untranslated in English.

Taut was forced out of Germany with the rise of the Nazis. He was promised work in the Soviet Union in 1932 and 1933, and came back to Germany in February 1933 to a hostile political environment. Some say he was Jewish with Social Democratic leanings, he fled to Switzerland, then to Takasaki in Japan, where he produced three influential book-length appreciations of Japanese culture and architecture, comparing the historical simplicity of Japanese architecture with modernist discipline. Taut also taught crafts, industrial design, made furniture, did interior design work and three building designs (Taut designed Miratees Building, Ginza, Okuratei, Azabu, and Hyugatei, Atami. Only one survives).

Even though he was invited by the Japan International Architecture Associates to Japan, was a much more accomplished architect than Frank Lloyd Wright then, why did he have only three building to design and why did he have to teach crafts and industrial design? Some suggest that people with him were so worried about his relationship with the Nazis. Also, Taut had big a ego as an architect. He asked Mr. Hyuga when he designed mansion. Taut made three conditions: (1) not to bother him in the middle of his work, (2) non deadline and (3) no limit for budget.

Then assistant movie director Kurosawa Akira worte a screenplay called "German at Darumaji Temple" in 1941 before his debut movie "Sugata Sanshiro (1943)" as a director.