Inuyama-jo Castle

Inuyama-jo Castle
Item# AICHI004

Product Description

Inuyama-jo Castle
Inuyama (literally 'dog mountain') is a city located near Nagoya in Aichi, Japan.

National Treasure Inuyama-jo Castle

There are a number of famous attractions in and around the city. The most famous attraction is Inuyama-jo Castle on a 40m rise overlooking the Kiso river. This Japanese castle is also known as Hakutei-jo (White Emperor Castle), as named by the Confucian scholar Sorai Ogyu during the Edo-era. It is a four-story structure with two underground levels, although it has only three roofs. The castle was designated as a Japanese national treasure in 1935 and again in 1952. The castle in its current form was built in 1537 by Oda Nobuyasu, grandfather of the great warlord Oda Nobunaga. After construction, the castle had a rapid succession of different owners. After Toyotomi Hideyoshi took control of the area, he put Ishikawa Sadakiyo in charge of the castle. After the defeat of Hideyoshi by Matsudaira Tadayoshi Ogasawara Yoshitsugu received the castle. In 1616 the Naruse family was put in charge of the structure until the Meiji-era. After the Meiji Restoration the government seized the castle in 1869. The castle was damaged by the Great Nobi Earthquake in 1891. The castle was then given to the Naruse family under the condition that they repair the castle. The castle is the only privately owned castle in Japan (The Naruse family formed foundation, the foundation owned now). The castle survived all wars and has remained unchanged since it was built, making it the oldest original wooden castle in Japan.