Kogire and Tenugui (9)

Kogire and Tenugui (9)
Colorful antique kimono have become a popular interior decoration element. Most of the supply found in shops today was actually mass-produced in the Meiji-era or later. Foreign dealers were the first to recognize the value of kogire, or antique fabrics. With that, their popularity and price soared ten-fold in Japan as well. Most popular, however, were fabrics mass-produced in the Meiji-era or later. On the whole, Edo-era dyeing and weaving are modest in color, with none of the splendor seen in Meiji-era and later pieces. In contrast to the latter, however, which were mass-produced, Edo-era fabrics are the crystallization of handiwork in the true sense of the word, beginning with the spinning of the thread.

A Tenugui is a thin Japanese hand towel made of cotton. It is typically about 35 by 90 centimeters (13.7" x 35.4") in size, plain weaved and is almost always printed with some pattern. It can be used for anything a towel could be used for - as a washcloth, dishcloth, headband, souvenir or decoration. Towels made from terry cloth have replaced many of its use in the household. However tenugui is still popular as a souvenir, decoration and as a head covering in Kendo. A tenugui frequently appears in anime and manga as a prop during a sento scene.