Paper

Paper
Izumo Mingeishi: Izumo folkcraft hand-made paper. The Izumo region, in the West part of Japan, has been documented as a paper production area since ancient times. Late Living National Treasure Abe Eishiro built upon this local tradition, and with the counsel of the founder of the Folkcraft Movement Yanagi Sosetsu, established Izumo Mingeishi.

2. Abe Eishiro (Paper Maker)

Sekishu washi: Sekishu Banshi paper (a type of Washi) designated as a UNESCO intangible cultural heritage. The world-class Sekishu Washi is popular in various forms, such as traditional Japanese letter paper, postcards, notepaper, and business cards. The skills and techniques for making Sekishu Washi, a type of Japanese paper that has a history of 1,300 years, are taught at Sekishu Washi Hall, which also sells Washi products and offers hands-on Washi-making workshop.

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Echizen Hosho: An abbreviation of hoshogami, hosho paper. A type of washi (Japanese paper). A thick, smooth, white paper made from the fiber of the mulberry tree, or kozo. Hosho is thought to date back to the Kamakura-era (1192-1333) and the term originally meant a form of governmental decree. Instead of giving orders directly, a shogun or person of high office would give his commands in written form without signing his name. Gradually hosho came to mean the type of paper on which the orders were written. In the Edo-era hosho was used for most documents as well as calligraphy, and from late Edo onwards for ukiyo-e, woodblock prints. As it was used by all the feudal clans, production was widespread, but of all production areas Echizen (modern Fukui Prefecture) produced the highest quality paper called Echizen Hosho , which was thick, white and supple. Hosho was used for special full-color prints nishiki-e; including many of the exquisite surimono, individually produced Edo-era works. Easily burnished, hosho readily picked up gauffrage or crimping. Today hosho is still produced in Fukui Prefecture and is used for formal documents and for printmaking. Iwano IchIbe, Living National Treasure paper maker, even Picasso loved his papers.

2. Iwano Ichibe (Paper Maker)

Tosa Tengu Joshi: Yoshii Genta (1826-1908) invented "Tengu joushi". The thinnest paper in the world.

The finest, strongest handmade paper in the world at a thickness of 0.03 millimeters was, at one time, exported for use as typewriting paper all over the world. That was until the advent of modern office machinery and pulp paper. When handmade paper became obsolete, the majority of craftsmen involved in the production of Tosa Tengu Joshi gradually went their separate ways and the workshops closed down.

2. Hamada Yukio (Tosa tengu joshi maker)

Hosokawa-shi: Japanese tissue is a thin, strong paper made from vegetable fibers. Japanese tissue may be made from one of three plants, the kozo plant (Broussonetia papyrifera, Paper Mulberry tree), the mitsumata (Edgeworthia chrysantha) shrub and the gampi tree (Diplomorpha sikokiana). The long, strong fibers of the kozo plant produce very strong, dimensionally stable papers, and are the most commonly used fibers in the making of Japanese paper (washi). Tissue made from kozo, or kozogami, comes in varying thicknesses and colors, and is an ideal paper to use in the mending of books. The majority of mending tissues are made from kozo fibers, though mitsumata and gampi papers also are used.

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